How to Dye Eggs with Food Coloring Agents?

How to dye eggs with food coloring
Credit: Pixabay

Dying Easter eggs is a fun activity for kids and adults alike. You have the opportunity to give your inner artist an outlet every year and be creative. But, some of us still don’t know how to dye eggs with food coloring agents.

Don’t worry; we have you covered! These simple Easter egg coloring ideas will make decorating them much easier for Easter 2017. Check them out.

How to Dye Eggs with Food Coloring Agents

1. Earthy-Colored Easter Eggs

Materials required:

  • Boiled eggs
  • Glass or plastic cup
  • ½-¾ cup of water
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Plastic spoons
  • Toothpicks (if you are using gel dye)
  • 1 cooling rack and food color

Directions

Add one tablespoon of vinegar to the water. Dip the tip of a toothpick in the food color. Stir the toothpick in the vinegar water and mix it well with a spoon.

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Place the egg on the spoon and gently drop it in the colored water. Let it sit in the colored water until the egg is of the desired color tone.

Transfer the dyed egg onto the cooling rack and let it dry. Mix other colors into the same water for more color variety, or you can try another color.

2. Marbled Easter Eggs

Materials required:

  • Boiled eggs
  • Vegetable oil
  • Glass or plastic cup
  • ½-¾ cup of water
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Plastic spoons
  • Cooling rack
  • Food color

Directions

Add a teaspoon of vegetable oil to each container of dye and stir. Dip the boiled egg briefly using a spoon. Since oil and water don’t mix, there will be color only on some parts of the egg, which will create a marbled effect. Repeat this process for a brighter tone.

Dry the egg on a paper towel. Once it has dried completely, brush it with some vegetable oil as it will add some shine.

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3. Polka Dot Easter Eggs

Materials required:

  • Boiled eggs
  • Dot stickers
  • Glass or plastic cup
  • ½-¾ cup of water
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Plastic spoons
  • 1 cooling rack
  • Food color

Directions

Place dot stickers on the egg. Mix the food color with water and vinegar. Gently put the egg in the colored liquid. Roll it well for the even application. Take it out and dry it on a cooling rack.

Once the egg is dry, remove the dot stickers. You can enhance the dots by coloring them in or leave them as is.

4. Glitter Easter Eggs

Materials required:

  • Boiled eggs
  • Glitter paint
  • Glass or plastic cup
  • ½-¾ cup of water
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Plastic spoons
  • 1 cooling rack
  • Food color

Directions

Add white vinegar to the dye for a deeper color. Place the egg in the dye using a spoon. Remove it and let it dry on the cooling rack.

When dried completely, paint the dyed egg with glitter paint and let it dry. You can also add glitter to the dye before dipping the egg.

5. Hollow Easter Eggs

Materials required:

  • Eggs
  • Baby nasal aspirator
  • Gel paste color or liquid food color
  • ½ cup of water
  • Vinegar
  • Paper towel
  • Needle

Directions

Make a tiny hole on each end of the egg. Place the aspirator on one side of the egg and squeeze, blowing the yolk out from the other side. Rinse it and remove the extra water. Allow it to dry completely.

In a half cup of water, mix one tablespoon of vinegar and add five drops of gel paste coloring, or 20 drops of liquid food coloring agents. Stir well.

Gently place the hollow egg in the dye. Let it sit for a while before removing it. Let it dry on a paper towel.

And there you have it; five easy ways on how to dye eggs with food coloring agents. So, get creative and try any of these Easter egg dying ideas to make your Easter 2017 all the more colorful.


Sources:

Graham, C. “HOW TO DYE EGGS WITH FOOD COLORING,” Tidbits, April 4, 2017; http://www.tidbits-cami.com/2017/04/how-to-dye-eggs-with-food-coloring.html, last accessed April 13, 2017.

“How to Dye Eggs for Easter,” WikiHow; http://www.wikihow.com/Dye-Eggs-for-Easter, last accessed April 13, 2017.

Hopper, C., “HOW TO DYE EGGS WITH FOOD COLORING,” Skip To My Lou, March 21, 2012; http://www.skiptomylou.org/how-to-dye-eggs-with-food-coloring/, last accessed April 13, 2017.